Category Archives: Problems & solutions

College rating system

A recent article by Scott Jaschik in Inside Higher Ed laid out President Obama’s proposed plan for (among other things) tying various rewards to specific performance metrics.  The article, titled Obama’s Ratings for Higher Ed appeared in the 22 August 2013 edition, and can be accessed via this link. In business, we say that ‘what gets …

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Competency-based transcripts

Greetings, colleagues. . . Competency-based education has been around for decades; the idea that we should specify learning outcomes for class meetings, courses and programs has become part of our mental model in higher education, particularly when it comes to assessment.  But, Northern Arizona University has taken the idea one step further in the development …

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Teaching and students: with them or for them?

Commission member Kristan Venegas of the University of Southern California sent me a link to an interesting article from the Teaching Professor blog.  Authored by Maryellen Weimer, the article is titled “Learning with Students vs. Doing for Students.”  In it, Professor Weimer is commenting on a quote she heard from a colleague:  ““I see myself …

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The role of incentives in motivation

Greetings, colleagues. . . As advisors, we’re frequently called upon to motivate people, whether those people are students, colleagues, administrators or others.  And, for as long as organizations have existed, scholars have been advancing theories about what motivates people.  Since motivation is part and parcel of the work we do, I thought you might be …

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College Reality Check

Greetings, colleagues. . . I recently ran across the following information: College costs can vary widely and the numbers may surprise you.  Selecting a college is a major decision, and paying for it can impact you for years to come.  College Reality Check helps you get a get the information you need to make informed …

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The Practical University

In the New York Times Opinion Pages on 4 April 2013, I came across “The Practical University,” an op-ed piece by David Brooks.  He opens the column with an interesting assertion: “The best part of the rise of online education is that it forces us to ask: What is a university for?“ He then goes …

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Ten Things Extraordinary People Say Every Day

Greetings, colleagues. . . While checking out LInkedIn this morning, I ran across “10 Things Extraordinary People Say Every Day” by Jeff Haden; the article is posted at Inc.com.  Here are the first five of the ten things Mr. Haden identified: Here’s what I’m thinking. I was wrong. That was awesome. You’re welcome. Can you …

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Cyberbullying

Greetings, colleagues. . . Please check out this recent article in USA Today by Byron Acohido; in case you have trouble with the link, the article title is “Cyberbullying extends to workplace, bedroom.”  It was originally published in USA Today online on 18 February 2013.  We’ve seen a lot of media attention on cyberbullying over the …

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In the eye of the beholder

Greetings, colleagues. . . This month’s post is about something we all have to deal with as advisors: budgets. I’ve written and talked in many venues about the positive and not-so-positive things that can happen when education borrows ideas from business; in the case of budgeting, I think most folks view it as a completely …

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Are you stressed?

Perhaps you read the recent article at Forbes.com on the most and least stressful jobs of 2013; it received some attention in academics because the author, Susan Adams, asserted that university professors have the least stressful job. (If you haven’t yet read the article, I encourage you to check it out: The Least Stressful Jobs …

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